Presentations

We give many presentations about our research and other activities. We try to make the presentation materials available whenever possible. You'll find links to most of our talks below.

July 19, 2017 at 10:00am

Driving Deployment with Demand

Technical Workshop on Fuel Cycle Simulation

Kathryn Huff

Columbia, SC

Technical Presentation

http://goo.gl/6aGJd8

This presentation was presented by Kathryn Huff, but was the collective work of Kathryn Huff, Anthony Scopatz, Jin Whan Bae, and Robert Flanagan. It seeks to stimulate discussion about algorithms for driving deployment based on demand (not just of power, but of fuel materials, reprocessing capacity, etc) in each of the existing simulators. This discussion is tightly in line with the Demand Driven Cycamore Archetypes NEUP proposal.

July 12, 2017 at 9:15am

Academic Open Source

SciPy

Kathryn Huff

Austin, TX

Keynote

http://katyhuff.github.io/2017-07-12-scipy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nqzvnqg4OJ8

Academia, in particular academic science, has a great deal to learn and gain from its harmony with open source. Similarly, open source communities increasingly find themselves responsible for education. This talk will touch on the past, present, and possible future of the rich, delicate symbiosis between academia and open source.

July 6, 2017 at 3:00pm

Best Practices in Computational Nuclear Engineering

Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division

Kathryn Huff

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Seminar

https://katyhuff.github.io/2017-07-06-ornl

The world's energy future depends on improved safety and sustainability of nuclear energy. Insights can be drawn from numerical experiments that model and simulate nuclear energy systems, but computational nuclear engineering is sufficiently complex that sophisticated scientific software methods, high-performance computing resources, and data analysis algorithms are essential. Furthermore, improved reproducibility and verification in these numerical experiments can be achieved only through judicious use of scientific computing best practices. This talk will touch on best practices approaches to building software and simulations for computational nuclear engineering. These include concepts covered in the paper 'Best Practices in Scientific Computing' (Wilson, et al) as well as concepts covered in 'Effective Computation in Physics' (Scopatz, Huff). It describes a set of practices that are easy to adopt and have proven effective in many research settings. None of these practices will guarantee efficient, error-free software development, but used in concert they will reduce the number of errors in scientific software, make it easier to reuse, and save the authors of the software time and effort that can used for focusing on the underlying scientific questions.

June 15, 2017 at 9:00am

Workshop on Multi-physics modeling and simulation of molten salt reactors

Alexander Lindsay

Berkeley, CA

Technical Presentation

/img/pres/2017-06-15-msr-pres.pdf

This work introduces Moltres, a new physics application for multiphysics modeling of fluid-fuelled molten salt reactors. The neutronics model, thermal hydraulics model, and their coupling in the MOOSE framework are described. Neutron and precursor equations are implemented using an Action system that allows use of an arbitrary number of groups with no change in the input card. Results for many-channel configurations in 2D-axisymmetric and 3D coordinates are presented. These are compared against other coupled models as well as the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment.

May 31, 2017 at 12:00 noon

Best Practices in Scientific Computing

2017 PI4 Computational Bootcamp

Kathryn Huff

Urbana, IL

Guest Speaker

http://katyhuff.github.io/2017-05-31-pi4

This talk covers a set of concepts covered in the paper 'Best Practices in Scientific Computing' (Wilson, et al) as well as concepts covered in 'Effective Computation in Physics' (Scopatz, Huff). It describes a set of practices that are easy to adopt and have proven effective in many research settings. Our recommendations are based on several decades of collective experience both building scientific software and teaching computing to scientists, reports from many other groups, guidelines for commercial and open source software development, and on empirical studies of scientific computing and software development in general. None of these practices will guarantee efficient, error-free software development, but used in concert they will reduce the number of errors in scientific software, make it easier to reuse, and save the authors of the software time and effort that can used for focusing on the underlying scientific questions.

May 20, 2017 at 9:40am

Do it For Science

PyCon

Kathryn Huff

Portland, OR

Keynote

http://katyhuff.github.io/2017-05-20-pycon

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kaGS4YXwciQ

In this talk, I seek to inspire open source python programmers to leverage their considerable skills and will toward scientific research software.

April 20, 2017 at 4:00pm

Modeling and Simulation of Advanced Reactors and Fuel Cycles

UC Davis Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Seminar

Kathryn Huff

Davis, CA

Invited Seminar

http://katyhuff.github.io/2017-04-20-davis

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YqTxZC1i-B0#t=6m28s

Nuclear power provides the majority of our nation's safe, reliable, carbon free energy. Advanced nuclear reactors and nuclear fuel cycles promise to further improve passive safety, fuel utilization, and environmental impacts of this key energy source. This seminar will discuss open, reproducible, computational approaches to modeling and simulation of the multiple coupled physics and scales inherent to these systems. Approaches will include (1) agent based modeling of future energy growth, reprocessing, and fuel management scenarios, (2) the interplay between probabilistic and deterministic neutron transport methods for design and safety analysis, and (3) development of reactor physics kernels for the MOOSE (multiphysics object oriented simulation environment) framework.

April 12, 2017 at 5:15pm

Benefits of Siting a Borehole Repository at a Non-Operating Nuclear Facility

International High-Level Radioactive Waste Meeting 2017

Jin Whan Bae

Charlotte, NC

Research Paper Presentation

/pres/2017-benefits-ihlrwm.pdf

This work evaluates a potential solution for two pressing matters in the viability of nuclear energy: spent fuel disposal and power plants that no longer operate. The potential benefits of siting a borehole repository at a shut down nuclear power plant facility are analyzed from the perspective of myriad stakeholders. This assessment indicates that integrated siting will make economic use of the shut down power plant, take advantage of spent fuel handling infrastructure at those sites, minimize transportation costs, expedite emptying the crowded spent fuel storage pools accross the country, and will do so at sites more likely to have consenting communities.

April 7, 2017 at 3:00pm

Benefits of Siting a Borehole Repository at a Non-Operating Nuclear Facility

American Nuclear Society Student Conference 2017

Jin Whan Bae

Pittsburgh, PA

Research Paper Presentation

/pres/2017-benefits-ihlrwm.pdf

This work evaluates a potential solution for two pressing matters in the viability of nuclear energy: spent fuel disposal and power plants that no longer operate. The potential benefits of siting a borehole repository at a shut down nuclear power plant facility are analyzed from the perspective of myriad stakeholders. This assessment indicates that integrated siting will make economic use of the shut down power plant, take advantage of spent fuel handling infrastructure at those sites, minimize transportation costs, expedite emptying the crowded spent fuel storage pools accross the country, and will do so at sites more likely to have consenting communities.

March 2, 2017 at 11:00am

Reduce Classroom Bias with a Random Name Picker

AE3 Lightning Symposium

Kathryn Huff

233 Grainger Library, Urbana, IL

Invited Lightning Talk

http://katyhuff.github.io/2017-03-02-ae3

To reduce implicit bias in the classroom, I use a random name picker. It's working.

February 14, 2017 at 12:00pm

Innovation and Nuclear Energy: A Love Story

Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering Undergraduate Seminar Series

Kathryn Huff

Talbot Laboratory, Urbana, IL

Invited Seminar

http://katyhuff.github.io/2017-02-14-npre

This seminar will relate the epic 70-year romance between nuclear reactor design and nuclear reactor reality. It will recite the origins of the steamy long-term relationship between oxide fuel and light water, but will also shed light on both star-crossed and promising pairings between novel fuels, coolants, and moderators. Many strange sagas set in the Idaho desert will be told: tragic tales of youthful experiments (SL-1), hopeful meet-cutes (MSRE), and doomed couplings (ARE). The unique poetry of so-called 'paper reactors' will be touched upon, as will a tantalizing tale of promise: advanced nuclear reactors in the 21st century.

In all seriousness, this talk will discuss the history of advanced nuclear reactor design successes, failures, and possibilities from the 1940s to tomorrow. Nuclear power provides the majority of our nation's safe, reliable, carbon free energy. Advanced nuclear reactors and nuclear fuel cycles promise to further improve passive safety, fuel utilization, and environmental impacts of this key energy source. This talk gives a Valentine's-Day-themed history of those innovative advanced nuclear reactor designs as well as an overview of advanced reactor technologies today.

February 2, 2017 at 12:00pm

Advanced Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles: Simulation of Multiple Physics at Disparate Scales

Computational Science and Engineering Seminar Series

Kathryn Huff

1030 National Center for Supercomputing Applications, Urbana, IL

Invited Seminar

http://katyhuff.github.io/2017-02-02-cse

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWlUW_CFo3M

Nuclear power provides the majority of our nation's safe, reliable, carbon free energy. Advanced nuclear reactors and nuclear fuel cycles promise to further improve passive safety, fuel utilization, and environmental impacts of this key energy source. This seminar will discuss computational approaches to modeling and simulation of the multiple coupled physics and scales inherent to these systems. Approaches will include (1) agent based modeling of future energy growth, reprocessing, and fuel management scenarios, (2) the interplay between probabilistic and deterministic neutron transport methods for design and safety analysis, and (3) development of reactor physics kernels for the MOOSE (multiphysics object oriented simulation environment) framework.

Additionally, to appropriately distress this audience, this talk will touch on the origin, evaluation, processing, and validation of data in nuclear engineering. In particular, it will highlight the challenges presented by the variability of cross section data, the nuclear structure they attempt to capture, and real simulation accuracy concerns related to compensating errors within current evaluated nuclear data sets.

January 27, 2017 at 2:50pm

Lessons Learned

The Practice of Reproducible Research: Case Studies and Lessons from the Data-Intensive Sciences

Kathryn Huff

Sutardja Dai Hall, Banato Auditorium, University of California, Berkeley

Invited Lightning Talk

http://katyhuff.github.io/2017-01-27-bids

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w0NvZh44stg&t=45m24s

This symposium will serve as the launch event for our new open, online book, titled The Practice of Reproducible Research. The book contains a collection of 31 case studies in reproducible research practices written by scientists and engineers working in the data-intensive sciences. Each case study presents the specific approach that the author used to achieve reproducibility in a real-world research project, including a discussion of the overall project workflow, major challenges, and key tools and practices used to increase the reproducibility of the research. This lightning talk will focus on the Lessons Learned synthesis chapter.

The book launch event is described in full, here.

October 13, 2016 at 4:00pm

Data In Nuclear Engineering

Informatics 500 Seminar

Kathryn Huff

Urbana, IL

Invited Guest Lecture

http://katyhuff.github.io/2016-10-13-info500

This talk gave an overview of the origin, evaluation, processing, and validation of data in nuclear engineering. In particular, it highlighted the variability of cross section data, the nuclear structure they attempt to capture, and real concerns related to compensating errors within current evaluated nuclear data sets. This draws on a talk by Morgan C. White concerning what he terms 'the data dilemma.'

August 27, 2016

Human Learning at Scale

PyData Conference

Kathryn Huff

Chicago, IL

Invited Keynote

http://katyhuff.github.io/2016-08-27-pydata

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6yvr-tznCJ0

Today's researchers and future researchers are in great need of a new kind of curriculum, but delivering that curriculum at scale is a mounting challenge. I'll discuss how a data-intensive computational world calls for data-intensive computational education at every level (including children, high-schoolers, college students, researchers, emeritus professors). This talk will touch on how my understanding of this need is informed by my own experience as well as work conducted with the Moore-Sloan Reproducibility and Open Science Working Groups at UW, NYU, and UCB. This talk will touch on attempts at many scales to meet the challenge at hand. These will include both failed and successful efforts by myself, my colleagues, organizations such as The Hacker Within and Software Carpentry, and it will also touch on the important contributions of the open source python community. Finally, I'll share a glimpse of my newest and most real challenges inserting data intensive computational workflows into traditional engineering curriculum.

June 19, 2016

Engineering Academic Software

Engineering Academic Software Dagstuhl Perspectives Workshop

Kathryn Huff

Schloss-Dagstuhl, GERMANY

Invited Participant

http://katyhuff.github.io/2016-06-19-dagstuhl/

Software is at the heart of modern academic science, but our institutions for education and research are undergoing growing pains concerning the proper care and feeding of software and software developers in the context of academia. Conducting open, reproducible, computational science in the domains involves many practical challenges. Leading a software-development-focused research group in academia can be difficult to fund and manage with traditional strategies. Similarly, programs for training students in the domain sciences to become effective computational researchers are rare, immature, untested, or untennable. Research leaders are also faced with challenges in software sustainability and are unprepared to develop the user-developer communities needed to sustain and improve their software in their scientific domain. Finally, efforts to improve the quality of scientific software through top-down pressure are hampered by publication venues (journals, etc.) hesitant to adopt and uphold stricter software quality requirements. Software Carpentry, Lab Carpentry, The Hacker Within, and other initiatives are currently lowering the barriers for academics who produce software as part of their research work. However, more effort is needed to support a new generation of computationally fluent research teams.

May 27, 2016 at 11:00am

BIDS: Berkeley Institute for Data Science

Nuclear Data Science Workshop - Sorma West

Kathryn Huff

University of California, Berkeley, CA

Lightning Talk

http://katyhuff.github.io/2016-05-27-sorma

A discussion of the various eductional activities at the Berkeley Institute for Data Science and at Berkeley more generally

May 3, 2016

Reproducibility Initiatives at the Berkeley Institute for Data Science

NYU Reproducibility Symposium

Kathryn Huff

Brooklyn, NY

Invited Keynote

http://bids.github.io/2016-05-03-nyu

In parallel with the Moore-Sloan Data Science Environments at UW and NYU, the Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS) has a working group focused on Reproducibility and Open Science. This working group has hosted workshops, horizon scans, tutorials, and seminars at Berkeley to encourage discussion, identify needs, and assist scientists with adopting available reproducibility tools. We are engaged in numerous projects related to these efforts. One is the development of a book of "reproducible case studies" that we collected from scientists across institutions and scientific disciplines. Each case study is a collection of a researcher’s summary of their most reproducible workflow, their insights about the tools used, the distinct stages of the workflow, the difficulties encountered while making the project more reproducible or replicable, and finally, any noteworthy benefits realized from the use of specific tools or research strategies. The book is intended to be a resource for scientists seeking to learn about potential best practices and processes that they might use toward reproducibility in their own work. This talk will review what we discovered through this process, including insights about researcher workflows, pain points, incentives, and human challenges.

March 3, 2016 at 11:00am

Progress on Coupled Physics Modeling in Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactors

Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division

Kathryn Huff

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Seminar

https://katyhuff.github.io/2016-03-03-ornl

This talk will discuss progress using various approaches to coupled physics analysis of reactor transients in Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactors (FHRs), with particular focus on the Pebble-Bed, Fluoride Salt Cooled, High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR). These have evolved from algebraic and 0-D models to more comprehensive 3D models. Development of steady state benchmarks for FHR simulation will be touched upon, as will challenges encountered in conducting benchmark comparisons among software of differing capabilities in this arena. The development and implementation of an incompressible but thermally expandable model of salt flow through the pebble bed will be discussed as well, in the context of implementation within the MOOSE framework.

March 2, 2016 at 1:30-2:30pm

Reproducible Approaches to Modeling and Simulation in Nuclear Energy

Nuclear Engineering Department Colloquium

Kathryn Huff

University of Tennesee, Knoxville

Invited

https://katyhuff.github.io/2016-03-02-utk

http://sf.ites.utk.edu/utk/Play/90f40585222b4f90913d04e0be80a6f81d?catalog=eb238cab-f997-4587-9b7b-d0a0ab83420f

The world's energy future depends on improved safety and sustainability of nuclear reactor designs and fuel cycle strategies. Insights can be drawn from numerical experiments that model and simulate these systems. Both reactor and nuclear fuel cycle dynamics are sufficiently complex that sophisticated scientific software methods, high-performance computing resources, and data analysis algorithms are essential to improving our understanding of them. Furthermore, improved reproducibility and verification in these numerical experiments can be achieved through judicious use of scientific computing best practices. This talk will touch on best practices approaches to building software and simulations for coupled physics analysis of reactor transients in the Pebble-Bed, Fluoride Salt Cooled, High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR) as well as Cyclus, the agent-based nuclear fuel cycle simulation framework.

November 15, 2015 at 2:00pm

A Pythonic Future for Science Education

Supercomputing Conference, Workshop on Python For High Performance Computing

Kathryn Huff

Austin, TX

Keynote

http://katyhuff.github.io/2015-11-15-pyhpc

Detailed computational models, massively parallelized calculations, and enormously collaborative simulation projects are increasingly integral to the advancement of science. However, the caliber of this work is limited by a workforce lacking formal training in essential software development skills. To address this unmet need, a number of initiatives (e.g. Software Carpentry, Data Carpentry) have developed online resources and led short courses addressing software development best practices such as version control and test driven code development, as well as basic skills such as UNIX mobility. With the exception of the Software Carpentry Drivers License for High Performance Computing, however, these initiatives stop just shy of parallelization concepts and skills, and their scalability and sustainability is further limited by the volunteer power on which they run. The challenge at hand will only be sustainably solved when best practices in research-grade scientific computing have penetrated the traditional science and engineering curriculum in universities. This talk will describe a new effort to embed best practices for reproducible, application-focused, research-grade scientific computing into traditional university curriculum. In particular, a set of open source, liberally licensed, IPython (now Jupyter) notebooks are being developed and tested to accompany a book “Effective Computation in Physics: A Field Guide to Research in Python.” These interactive lecture materials lay out in-class exercises for a project-driven university course and are accordingly intended to be forked, modified and reused by professors across universities and disciplines. With Python as a teaching language, this course prepares university students for research at scale by approaching practical scientific computing challenges such as data structures, performant simulation design, hierarchical data storage, parallelization, analysis, and visualization.

November 6, 2015 at 11:00am

A Computational Future For Science Education

National Center for Supercomputing Applications

Kathryn Huff

University of Illinois, Urbana, IL

Colloquium

http://katyhuff.github.io/2015-11-06-ncsa/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYET0KJbNRU

Detailed computational models, massively parallelized calculations, and enormously collaborative simulation projects are increasingly integral to the advancement of science. However, the caliber of this work is limited by a workforce lacking formal training in a reproducible, transparent, software development skill suite that is becoming increasingly essential. To address this unmet need, a number of initiatives (e.g. Software Carpentry, Data Carpentry, and The Hacker Within) have developed online resources, led short courses, and nurtured local communities addressing software development best practices such as version control and test driven code development, as well as basic skills such as UNIX mobility. In addition to unique contributions such as a Drivers License for High Performance Computing, Software Carpentry conducts workshops at research institutions around the world. These workshops seek to provide time efficient introductions to essential programming languages and tools without turning “biochemists and mechanical engineers into computer scientists”. The Hacker Within similarly nurtures a peer-driven community for scientific computing skill sharing. It does so through regular meetings in a few local chapters around the world, including one at the University of Illinois. The scalability and sustainability of these initiatives, however, is limited by the volunteer power on which they run, so their challenge will only be sustainably solved when best practices in scientific computing have penetrated the traditional science and engineering curriculum in universities. This talk will describe one new effort to embed best practices for reproducible scientific computing into traditional university curriculum. In particular, a set of open source, liberally licensed, IPython (now Jupyter) notebooks are being developed and tested to accompany a book “Effective Computation in Physics.” These interactive lecture materials lay out in-class exercises for a project-driven upper-level undergraduate course and are accordingly intended to be forked, modified and reused by professors across universities and disciplines.

October 3, 2013

Cyclus Fuel Cycle Simulation Capabilities with the Cyder Disposal System Model

American Nuclear Society Conference

Kathryn Huff

Salt Lake City, UT

Conference Presentation

/pres/huff_cyclus_2013_pres.pdf

Presentation concerning the Cyder disposal system model built for the Cyclus tool.

March 1, 2011

Cyclus: An Open, Modular, Next Generation Fuel Cycle Simulator Platform

Waste Management Symposium

Kathryn Huff

Phoenix, AZ

Poster

/pres/huff_cyclus_2011_pres.pdf

poster concerning Cyclus open next generation fuel cycle simulator.

June 2008

Consolidated Fuel Treatment Center and Advanced Burner Reactor

University of Chicago Big Problems Energy Analysis Course

Kathryn Huff

Chicago, IL

Seminar

/pres/biris_consolidated_2008.pdf

August 2004

Digital Filtering Applications to the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer

Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE-3)

Kathryn Huff

Los Alamos, NM

REU Summer Seminar

/img/pres/huff_digital_2004_pres.png

Digital filtration application to the signal from the LSDS at LANSCE-3.

August 2003

Beam Plug Project and Second Chip Project

Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE-3)

Kathryn Huff

Los Alamos, NM

REU Summer Seminar

/pres/huff_beam_2003_pres.pdf

A project concerning the necessary size of beam plug in the fictional scenario of an uncontrollable accelerator at LANSCE.